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These Early American articles feature the time era from 1790 to 1839.

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Pineapple Cheese

An old newspaper ad, published right after the civil war ended simply stated, "Pine Apple Cheese. 50 Boxes received by mail-boat, and for sale by Geo. C. Hunter & Co. Agents for Manufacturers." Pine Apple Cheese? What kind of cheese is that? Does it taste like pineapple? Was it made from pineapple? I had never heard of this cheese before. So I sought out, but in vain, to find a modern counterpart. I was left to go back in time and read up on this mystery cheese. The History Behind Pineapple Cheese In 1808...Continue Reading

Sugar Blues - A Sweet Wrapper

Today, most of us here in America can still buy sugar which comes in a paper bag. Yet, paper is no stranger to sugar since wrapping it in paper goes back quite some time in history. Although sugar cones, or loaves as they were also called, wrapped in paper are found much earlier than the 19th century, references from the early 1800's show that if you found yourself in the Merchant's shop to purchase sugar you would still find cone shaped loaves that were wrapped in a blue-purple paper. This type of blue paper...Continue Reading

Simple Remedies

I run across a lot of these sort of lists for remeides but there are many on this particular list I had actually never run across before. It was quite an interesting list to read. It's taken from the The Lady's Annual Register and Housewife's Memorandum Book of 1838. Mustard mixed in the usual way, and taken into the stomach, is the speediest emetic; and is of singular use in ejecting poisonous substances from the stomach, if resorted to immediately. So simple a remedy ought to be known by every one. Cotton wet with...Continue Reading

Unfolding the Mysteries of Sealing Wax and Wafers

Introduction To Sealing Wax and Wafers In the 19th century, sealing wax was a material made by the melting of lac or rosin with turpentine and pigments. In it's earliest forms it would have been made of beeswax and resin. The sealing wax was used to "seal" the letters or envelopes, with or without a wafer. During the early to mid 19th century the use of the wafer became popular in less formal correspondence. Often times people would imprint their sealing wax with initials, coat of arms, or other insignia as their personal mark...Continue Reading

In the Early Kitchen...Cooking Utensils

WOODEN WARES There was quite a variety of the kitchen items made from wood. A pretty good list includes wooden tubs, boxes, buckets, bowls, bread troughs, pans, sieves, sifters, potato mashing "beetles", meat "beetles", hickory egg-beaters, spaddles or round short hickory sticks flattened at one end, paste-boards, coffee-sticks, mush-sticks, clothes-sticks, spoons and ladles. Oak was considered a better choice over the cedar wood. Often times the buckets with lids contained sifted flour and other meals. It was common practice in the South to remove the flour from the barrel, sift it and add it...Continue Reading

A Look Around the Early Country Kitchen

"IN the primitive days of our grandfathers' time, When the fire-place, genial and bright, Its cavernous recesses glowing with flame, Filled the old-fashioned kitchen with light;" - Taken from a poem by Lizzie Clark Hardy 1877 Kitchens have changed dramatically since the early days of the 19th century. They were simple and often very plainly furnished. This simple mentality is reiterated in the statement 'A fat kitchen maketh a lean will'. So simplicity was the key to kitchens in the early days, even in food selection. This is how the kitchen was summed up...Continue Reading

Wintertime Maladies

When winter gets here it likes to dry our skin. Most of us can relate since we still suffer with chapped lips and dried hands, the very same things our ancestors have dealt with through the centuries. Only today we grab the bottle of lotion for our hands and burt's bees wax, or chapstick, to ease our irritated lips. Interestingly the book "A New System of Domestic Cookery" published in 1807 gives the following recipes for chapped hands and lips. This year makes these recipes exactly 200 years old. So here is what they used...Continue Reading

If Walls Could Say, "I'm Clean!"

WALLS The methods of cleaning paint, wallpaper, and wainscoting varied only slightly throughout the early 19th century. Between 1800 and 1840 we see a few methods spoken of throughout the various cookbooks or servants companions that were being published. One such book called A New System of Domestic Cookery published in 1807 explains how to clean paint: Never use a cloth, but take off the dust with a little long-haired brush, after blowing off the loose parts with the bellows. With care, paint will look well for a length of time. When soiled, dip a...Continue Reading

TWELVE BILLS OF FARE

A Bill of FARE for JANUARY. First Course. 1 Cod's Head. 2 Soup Sante. 3 Roast Beef. 4 Scotch Collops. 5 Leg of Lamb. 6 Plumb Pudding. 7 Petit Patties. 8 Boiled Chickens. 9 Tongue. Second Course. 1 Roast Turkey. 2 Jellies. 3 Woodcocks. 4 Marinated Smelts. 5 Leg of Lamb. 6 Almond Cheese-cakes. 7 Minced Pies. 8 Larks. 9 Lobsters. A Bill of FARE for FEBRUARY. First Course. 1 Dish of Fish. 2 Pease Soup. 3 Fillet of Veal. 4 Chickens. 5 French Pye. 6 Beef Collops. 7 Ham. 8 Rump of Beef...Continue Reading

Loaf Sugar

The old loaf sugar came from wooden molds that were conical shaped. Thus they themselves were cone shaped and a cook would have to pound the loaf to get loose sugar for cooking. They had to use special tongs/cutters to break of pieces of the loaf for consumption. The Frugal Housewife. from 1830 says this about its wrapping, "The purple paper, which comes on loaf sugar, boiled in cider, or vinegar, with a small bit of alum, makes a fine purple-slate color. Done in iron."...Continue Reading

Architecture & Building

Babies & Children

Fashion

Furniture

Games & Amusements

Gardens & Agriculture

Health & Beauty

Simple Remedies

I run across a lot of these sort of lists for remeides but there are many on this particular list I had actually never run across before. It was quite an interesting list to read. It's taken from the The Lady's Annual Register and Housewife's Memorandum Book of 1838. Mustard mixed in the usual way, and taken into the stomach, is the speediest emetic; and is of singular use in ejecting poisonous substances from the stomach, if resorted to immediately. So simple a remedy ought to be known by every one. Cotton wet with...Continue Reading

Wintertime Maladies

When winter gets here it likes to dry our skin. Most of us can relate since we still suffer with chapped lips and dried hands, the very same things our ancestors have dealt with through the centuries. Only today we grab the bottle of lotion for our hands and burt's bees wax, or chapstick, to ease our irritated lips. Interestingly the book "A New System of Domestic Cookery" published in 1807 gives the following recipes for chapped hands and lips. This year makes these recipes exactly 200 years old. So here is what they used...Continue Reading

House Cleaning and Organizing

If Walls Could Say, "I'm Clean!"

WALLS The methods of cleaning paint, wallpaper, and wainscoting varied only slightly throughout the early 19th century. Between 1800 and 1840 we see a few methods spoken of throughout the various cookbooks or servants companions that were being published. One such book called A New System of Domestic Cookery published in 1807 explains how to clean paint: Never use a cloth, but take off the dust with a little long-haired brush, after blowing off the loose parts with the bellows. With care, paint will look well for a length of time. When soiled, dip a...Continue Reading

In The Bathroom

In The Kitchen

Pineapple Cheese

An old newspaper ad, published right after the civil war ended simply stated, "Pine Apple Cheese. 50 Boxes received by mail-boat, and for sale by Geo. C. Hunter & Co. Agents for Manufacturers." Pine Apple Cheese? What kind of cheese is that? Does it taste like pineapple? Was it made from pineapple? I had never heard of this cheese before. So I sought out, but in vain, to find a modern counterpart. I was left to go back in time and read up on this mystery cheese. The History Behind Pineapple Cheese In 1808...Continue Reading

In the Early Kitchen...Cooking Utensils

WOODEN WARES There was quite a variety of the kitchen items made from wood. A pretty good list includes wooden tubs, boxes, buckets, bowls, bread troughs, pans, sieves, sifters, potato mashing "beetles", meat "beetles", hickory egg-beaters, spaddles or round short hickory sticks flattened at one end, paste-boards, coffee-sticks, mush-sticks, clothes-sticks, spoons and ladles. Oak was considered a better choice over the cedar wood. Often times the buckets with lids contained sifted flour and other meals. It was common practice in the South to remove the flour from the barrel, sift it and add it...Continue Reading

TWELVE BILLS OF FARE

A Bill of FARE for JANUARY. First Course. 1 Cod's Head. 2 Soup Sante. 3 Roast Beef. 4 Scotch Collops. 5 Leg of Lamb. 6 Plumb Pudding. 7 Petit Patties. 8 Boiled Chickens. 9 Tongue. Second Course. 1 Roast Turkey. 2 Jellies. 3 Woodcocks. 4 Marinated Smelts. 5 Leg of Lamb. 6 Almond Cheese-cakes. 7 Minced Pies. 8 Larks. 9 Lobsters. A Bill of FARE for FEBRUARY. First Course. 1 Dish of Fish. 2 Pease Soup. 3 Fillet of Veal. 4 Chickens. 5 French Pye. 6 Beef Collops. 7 Ham. 8 Rump of Beef...Continue Reading

Loaf Sugar

The old loaf sugar came from wooden molds that were conical shaped. Thus they themselves were cone shaped and a cook would have to pound the loaf to get loose sugar for cooking. They had to use special tongs/cutters to break of pieces of the loaf for consumption. The Frugal Housewife. from 1830 says this about its wrapping, "The purple paper, which comes on loaf sugar, boiled in cider, or vinegar, with a small bit of alum, makes a fine purple-slate color. Done in iron."...Continue Reading

Horsehair Sieve

A kitchen utensil often used in sifting bran. A man named Benjamin Gilbert was a tanner/currier/shoemaker by birth, but he percieved a market in making horsehair sieves for the common people who already used these in the making of meal. He began his business venture around 1818 and they did become quite popular....Continue Reading

Interior Decoration...

The Bathroom

The Bedroom

The Dining Room

The Kitchen

A Look Around the Early Country Kitchen

"IN the primitive days of our grandfathers' time, When the fire-place, genial and bright, Its cavernous recesses glowing with flame, Filled the old-fashioned kitchen with light;" - Taken from a poem by Lizzie Clark Hardy 1877 Kitchens have changed dramatically since the early days of the 19th century. They were simple and often very plainly furnished. This simple mentality is reiterated in the statement 'A fat kitchen maketh a lean will'. So simplicity was the key to kitchens in the early days, even in food selection. This is how the kitchen was summed up...Continue Reading

General

The Hallway

The Library

The Living Room

The Parlor

Laundry

Linen Closet

Misc

Sewing and Crafts

Social Life & Etiquette

Unfolding the Mysteries of Sealing Wax and Wafers

Introduction To Sealing Wax and Wafers In the 19th century, sealing wax was a material made by the melting of lac or rosin with turpentine and pigments. In it's earliest forms it would have been made of beeswax and resin. The sealing wax was used to "seal" the letters or envelopes, with or without a wafer. During the early to mid 19th century the use of the wafer became popular in less formal correspondence. Often times people would imprint their sealing wax with initials, coat of arms, or other insignia as their personal mark...Continue Reading

Tools & Machines