1870,  Around the Home,  Browse By Era,  Browse by Subject,  In the Kitchen,  Victorian

Improved Kitchen Sink.

We represent on this page an important improvement in one of the most essential contrivances necessary in housekeeping, namely, a kitchen sink, which can also be used as a wash-basin, dish-pan, laundry wash-tub, and drainer. It possesses a valve, which is opened by raising the pull P; 0 is an overflow, and Q an adjustable partition, while S is the outlet and valve seat. If it is used as a sink, the water is let out entirely; by raising the handle or knob P, and turning the valve half way round, the valve S will be kept permanently open, resting as it does on two projecting p arms. The cover and adjustable partition Q constructing the chamber is in two pieces, and can be readily lifted out when it is necessary to clean it.

It is evident that, being a valve sink, it is not subject to the usual defect of other sinks in being choked up by coffee-grounds, tea-leaves, etc., as everything ~will discharge almost instantaneously, and being quickly refilled, it is easily kept clean and sweet. It is also made of galvanized iron, and adaptable to all the requirements of kitchen, pantry, or laundry.

These sinks are the production of Mr. George Jennings, the eminent sanitary engineer of London, and are for sale at the Jennings’ Sanitary Depot, 94 Beekman street, New York, of which Mr. A. G. Myers is manager. They are made 27 X 14 and 8 inches deep, and weigh about 70 pounds, while other sizes, larger and smaller, are in course of manufacture. They may be had either painted or galvanized.